Dutch Split Pea Soup

This Dutch split pea soup is packed full of meat and vegetables. It’s a hearty stick to your ribs winter dish. Plus it doesn’t take all day to make.

This Dutch split pea soup is perfect for cold winter nights. It's packed full of 3 different types of pork and is ready to eat in just over 2 hours.

When I was 23 years old I went to Amsterdam. I somehow managed to not get myself into trouble and the closest I got to “keeping it herbal” was drinking tea with my breakfast. The great thing about Amsterdam is that it’s walkable. I walked EVERYWHERE even though it was in fact the middle of January. Yeah, it’s cold in Amsterdam in January.

Really really really cold.

Plus in the middle of winter the “ladies of the night” still dressed scantily clad. That is job commitment right there.

This Dutch split pea soup is packed full of protein! It's thick, hearty and perfect for cold winter nights.

One day while I was walking around I decided I couldn’t stand the cold anymore and I needed to warm up. So I walked into a small restaurant looking to eat or drink just about anything that would help bring feeling back to my fingers and toes.

As I stared at the menu the waiter came over and we started chatting. He recommended that I try the Dutch split pea soup. Listen, I have always loved pea soup but it’s not exactly something I order out at restaurants. Usually it was somethingย my mom made a few times a year when there was pounds of ham leftover from Christmas and Easter.

This Dutch split pea soup will warm you up from head to toe. Packed full of meaty deliciousness and ready in no time.

The thing about this soup is that it’s a little bit different than what I consider to be a normal split pea soup. This baby is packed full of vegetables {celeriac is a key} and 3 different kinds of a pork. Seriously, 3 different kinds of pork….gah!

This soup is THICK and it’s meant to be that way. This soup is seriously stick to your ribs hearty!

{Thank you so much for joining me on my impromptu soup week. I hope you enjoyed todays recipe as well as my lamb meatball couscous soup and New England clam chowder.}

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Dutch Split Pea Soup

This Dutch split pea soup is packed full of meat and vegetables. It's a hearty stick to your ribs winter dish. Plus it's ready in just a couple hours.

Yield: 4-6 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours

Total Time: 2 hours 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound split peas, rinsed
  • 1-1/2 pound country style pork ribs
  • 3 strips thick sliced bacon, diced bacon
  • 2 leeks, white part only
  • 1 large russet potato, peeled and diced
  • 1 large carrot, diced
  • 1 medium celeriac, peeled and diced
  • 6-8 cups low sodium chicken stock
  • 1/2 pound smoked kielbasa sausage, sliced
  • Celery cleaves, minced for garnish
  • Kosher salt and pepper, to taste

Directions:

In a large dutch oven add split peas and top with pork ribs, diced bacon, leeks, potato, carrot and celeriac. Pour 6 cups chicken stock over the mixture but do not stir.

Top the dutch oven with a lid and bring to a boil. Once it's boiling reduce the heat to a simmer and let simmer for 1 hour. You do not need to stir while the soup is simmering. Just keep an eye that it does not get dried out. It should be fine but if the liquid gets low just add more stock.

After an hour give the soup a good stir and add more stock if it looks too thick. Cover the soup back up and let simmer for another 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes remove the lid and pull out the ribs. Remove the bones from the ribs and discard. Shred or cube the meat and add back to the soup pot.

Add in sliced sausage, stir to combine and let the soup simmer with the lid removed for about 15 minutes until the soup is thick and the sausage is warmed through.

Season with kosher salt and pepper and serve topped with chopped celery leaves.

Note: It's normal for the soup to thicken as it cools. When you re-heat it's best to add a little water or stock to thin out the soup.

25 Responses to “Dutch Split Pea Soup”

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    1
    Kristen @ A Mind Full Mom — February 20, 2015 at 7:46 am

    My daughter begs me to make Split Pea Soup, but my boys despise it. The addition of 3 kinds of pork will surely win them over!

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    Katie | Healthy Seasonal Recipes — February 20, 2015 at 7:53 am

    Brr, I just felt the chill reading about the cold city of Amsterdam. This soup would certainly warm me up. Love that it has 3 kinds of pork in it. And celeriac! Gotta love any recipe that embraces a storing crop when you hit late February.

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    Marye — February 20, 2015 at 7:56 am

    This bring back so many memories! I ate this a lot for lunch in the winter when I was a kid. I love the stuff!

  4. #
    4
    Patem — February 20, 2015 at 8:34 am

    What is celeriac? Is it the same thing as celery? If I can’t find it, can I substitute celery in it’s place?

    • nutmegnanny replied: — February 21st, 2015 @ 2:44 pm

      Hi Patem! Celeriac is the root of a variety of celery grown for it’s knobby root. It is also sometimes called celery root or knob celery. You can find it in most grocery stores over in the section where they sell root vegetables such as turnips and rutabaga. It’s a hard vegetable with a texture similar to a potato but with less starch and water. Before using it it should be peeled. If you cannot find celeriac you can use 2 cups diced celery in it’s place but the taste will be slightly different. Good luck and I hope you find the celeriac it’s a great vegetable ๐Ÿ™‚

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    Katie — February 20, 2015 at 8:58 am

    Oh my… Love the story and everything about this soup. I agree I love split pea but would never order it out. My husband would go ga-ga over this version of split pea–you would have him at kielbasa! Lol

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    Tonia from TheGunnySack — February 20, 2015 at 9:37 am

    What a great way to get introduced to a new recipe! I love love thick, hearty soups, especially in the winter.

  7. #
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    heather @french press — February 20, 2015 at 10:26 am

    I’m impressed, Amsterdam and NO trouble ๐Ÿ™‚ I love split pea, but my family does not happen to agree, but this looks SO thick and hearty I may be able to convince the hub to give it a go. He’s a sucker for pork

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    8
    Shannon @ Dinner from the Heart — February 20, 2015 at 10:41 am

    I love split pea soup and so does my hubby. 3 kinds of pork would make it taste so amazing. I’ve never tried it with celeriac – definitely going to give this a try. Pinning!

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    Cookin Canuck — February 20, 2015 at 11:04 am

    Ah, Amsterdam…yep, that was a fun city in my early twenties! I wish I had tried this split pea soup when I was there…it looks like it would satisfy anyone’s appetite!

  10. #
    10
    Alisa @ Go Dairy Free — February 20, 2015 at 11:28 am

    I was dying to know what made it “Dutch” – celeraic sounds like the perfect addition – and my husband would love the meaty touch! I stayed out of trouble in Amsterdam, too, surprisingly easy I think – it gets hyped up a bit. But you reminded me of how many delicious savory soups I ate when in Europe far too many years ago – I need to trial some of those memories at home.

  11. #
    11
    The Food Hunter — February 20, 2015 at 12:26 pm

    I like how thick this is and that there is 3 different kinds of pork

  12. #
    12
    Sharon @ What The Fork Food Blog — February 20, 2015 at 1:33 pm

    I always haaated split pea soup when I was growing up. Now I love it and can’t get enough. Don’t tell my parents though ๐Ÿ˜‰
    This looks delicious, love how thick it is!

  13. #
    13
    Erin — February 20, 2015 at 2:27 pm

    Three kinds of pork!!?? YES! I literally LOLd at the job commitment line. Truth. This soup looks delicious and, judging from the temps in these parts, perfect timing!

  14. #
    14
    Melanie | Melanie Makes — February 20, 2015 at 2:48 pm

    Seriously! These photos! I swear I’d eat a bowl of dirt after you photographed it because you make everything look amazing.

  15. #
    15
    kristy @ the wicked noodle — February 20, 2015 at 4:20 pm

    What is it about pea soup that is just so warm and comforting; more than even other creamy, hot soups? Love your recipe, looks absolutely delicious.

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    16
    kita — February 20, 2015 at 4:47 pm

    I LOVE thick and crazy good split pea soup. Can’t say I would ever be brave enough to order it out either but my god…. look at that perfect bowl. And that sausage… that sausage makes it.

  17. #
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    Martha @ A Family Feast — February 21, 2015 at 7:59 am

    What a wonderful hearty soup! And I love the addition of the celeriac!

  18. #
    18
    Kellie @ The Suburban Soapbox — February 21, 2015 at 9:43 am

    I love split pea soup. But, like your mom, I only make it a few times a year when I have a truckload of leftover ham. However, three kinds of pork….this may be finding a place in my dinner rotation. Hoooooolyyyy. This looks so good.

  19. #
    19
    Heather | girlichef — February 21, 2015 at 8:45 pm

    I have always wanted to go to Amsterdam, from the pictures I’ve seen and stories I’ve heard, it just sounds like an amazing, laid back place. And holy cow, this soup would definitely warm you to the core – it sounds so darn delicious. I mean, 3 kinds of pork! ๐Ÿ˜‰

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    Renee - Kudos Kitchen — February 23, 2015 at 7:52 am

    I’d love to hear more about your time in Amsterdam. Maybe another time? Anywho, this soup looks amazingly thick. I’m intrigued by the addition of three different kinds of meat. Talk about hearty.

  21. #
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    Peabody (Culinary Concoctions by Peabody) — February 25, 2015 at 10:24 pm

    You had me at three different types of pork…especially that sausage ๐Ÿ˜‰

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    Marco (just a Dutch guy) — December 4, 2016 at 10:42 am

    This was the best soup growing up. Been in the states 50+ years and Mom made the best soups ever. Any thing from pea soup, oxtail soup, lentil soup to vegetable soup with those little tiny meatballs in it. I used to tell her the she should open up a soup kitchen. Thing is she never wrote anything down it was all in her head. Problem is, is that she passed and took all those excellent recipes with her. So now it’s been trial and error, but I’m getting there. Trying to perfect her Nasi recipe now.

    • nutmegnanny replied: — December 12th, 2016 @ 11:38 pm

      Hi Marco! I loved hearing this story. Your mom sounded like quite the cook! I hope this soup brings back a lot of great memories ๐Ÿ™‚

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