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Fried Cornmeal Mush Recipe

This fried cornmeal mush recipe is the perfect Midwest breakfast. Delicious firm cornmeal (or you might call it polenta) is lightly fried in butter and drizzled with maple syrup. So incredibly simple and totally delicious. 

fried cornmeal mush sliced on a plate with maple syrup

Ever heard of mush?

Well, if you’re from the Midwest I’m guessing you have! 

If you’re from anywhere else in the United States you might call it fried polenta. 

Mush is something that we used to eat every so often while growing up.  We would buy it in an already prepared round, cut small slices and then fry in the butter. When the rounds were nice and toasty we would cover it with maple syrup which was my favorite part!

There is something that is so delicious about the buttery fried polenta and the sweet maple syrup. 

It’s perfect for breakfast, lunch and even dinner.

I mean, wouldn’t you love to eat anything titled fried cornmeal mush recipe? 

fried cornmeal mush sliced on a plate

NOW if you can’t easily find “mush” in a prepared roll you can simply make it yourself!

Just prepare the polenta according to directions and spread out in a casserole dish and let it set up overnight in the fridge.

When you are ready to make your mush you simply cut out some rounds (or into squares) and go on your merry way with the directions you find below.

I know a lot of my New York friends find the idea of fried polenta with sweet maple syrup to be odd BUT it’s worth it.

Around here they view it as straight-up savory and like to smother it in tomato sauce.

Um, nope. I’ll take mine with maple syrup!

Love this fried cornmeal mush recipe?

Why not try a few of my other tasty breakfast recipes!

fried cornmeal mush sliced on a plate with maple syrup

Fried Cornmeal Mush

Yield: 4 servings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

This fried cornmeal mush recipe is the perfect Midwest breakfast. Delicious firm cornmeal (or you might call it polenta) is lightly fried in butter and drizzled with maple syrup. So incredibly simple and totally delicious. 

Ingredients

  • 1 roll of firm polenta or cornmeal, sliced 1/2 inch thick
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • Maple syrup, for serving

Instructions

Set sliced polenta to the side.

Set a large skillet over medium-high heat and add butter.

Once the butter is melted add in the cornmeal slices.

Cook until brown, flip, and cook on the other side until brown, about 5 minutes per side.

Serve warm with maple syrup for drizzling.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 4 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 496Total Fat: 16gSaturated Fat: 9gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 6gCholesterol: 37mgSodium: 243mgCarbohydrates: 88gFiber: 3gSugar: 51gProtein: 4g

This website provides approximate nutrition information for convenience and as a courtesy only. Nutrition information can vary for a variety of reasons. For the most precise nutritional data use your preferred nutrition calculator based on the actual ingredients you used in the recipe.

Did you make this recipe?

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Doug Davis

Thursday 22nd of March 2018

I grew up in central Illinois in the 70s, and my dad would often buy "corn meal mush" (a log/brick--can't remember whether it was round or square), and fry it up, and we'd dip bits in syrup.

SO delicious!!!!!

mamie

Friday 17th of October 2014

Born and raised in southern Wisconsin...no such thing as mush or polenta in restaurants (local or corporate). University in central Minnesota...same as Wisconsin. Discovered polenta after college through Italian cookbooks. I first came across fried must in a small town northern Indiana throwback restaurant. It has proven revolutionary for my (mostly) gluten free kitchen! Why is a larger tube of mush drastically cheaper than a smaller tube of polenta???

Karen

Saturday 23rd of June 2012

My mom is from the north (Michigan & Indiana area) and we do fried grits and call it Mush.

Bea

Friday 12th of August 2011

WOW didnt think people even ate Mush anymore . It was a staple of life growing up in Iowa. I have not had it in years

Reeni

Tuesday 10th of May 2011

Me and mush are old friends! Never had it with maple syrup - I like these better than pancakes!

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